Italian style seafood salad

seafoood salad

Easy & Elegant

Preparation time: 15mins
Cooking time: 10mins
Serves 4

Ingredients
1 red capsicum
½ red chilli
1 zucchini
1 small red onion
1 large clove garlic
7 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt & black pepper
225 g ready-prepared small squid
3 sun-dried tomatoes in oil
1 teaspoons lemon juice
225g peeled, cooked prawns
50g rocket
3 tablespoons shredded fresh basil

Method

1. Deseed capsicum. Deseed and finely chop chilli. Trim zucchini. Peel onion. Peel and crush garlic. Cut capsicum, zucchini and onion into 2.5cm pieces and put in a bowl. Stir in 4 tablespoons olive oil. Season and toss well.

2. Heat a large pan or wok until very hot. Add capsicum, zucchini and onion mixture. Stir-fry for 5 minutes, or until softened. Remove and allow to cool.

3. Carefully cut the squid across into 1 cm thick slices. Drain tomatoes and cut into strips. Heat 2 tbsp olive oil in pan or wok. Add squid. Stir-fry for 2 minutes. Remove. Allow to cool. Put remaining olive oil and lemon juice in a bowl. Season and whisk well. Put cooled vegetables and squid in a large bowl.

Stir in the garlic, chilli, prawns, rocket and basil. Drizzle with oil and lemon dressing, season and toss to coat. Serve at once.

Per Serving: 1575kg, Protein 24g, Carbohydrate 5g, Fat 29g, Fibre 3g, Sodium 1.1g

12 ways to boost immunity

immunity

Now is the time to boost your immune system, before the cold weather really hits.  There are plenty of respiratory infections in circulation and your best defence is a robust immune system.

Here are 10 simple things you can do to boost your immunity:

  • Get sufficient exercise; which is minimum 150 minutes weekly for most adults.
  • Reduce your stress levels; even taking 5 minutes each day to do something that relaxes you will help.  Attending a meditation class will help even more.
  • Do breathing exercises; simple breathing awareness for 5 minutes daily will do. Qi Gong or Yoga exercises are even better.
  • Avoid eating refined sugar; use natural sweeteners like stevia if it helps.
  • Don’t smoke.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  • Have an acupuncture or cupping session. Yes either can boost your immune response or help you recover.¹
  • Take our popular liquid Panax Ginseng
  • Take our high potency Vitamin C supplement
  • Take our Defence Plus or Resistance Formula

(The above products are available at Freedom Chinese Medicine)

If you’d like to use Acupuncture or Chinese Herbs to boost your immunity. Contact us on 9486 5966 or click here to book online. If you haven’t been in for 3+ months or have never been to our clinic, come in by 30th April, 2018 & mention this offer to receive a $20 discount. Special applicable in our Open Room/ Community Acupuncture facility also.

Article written by:

Dr. Elaine Hickman

B.H.Sc. TCM (Acupuncture), Cert.Cl.Ac (Beijing)
Registered Doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine

Freedom Chinese Medicine
261 Waterdale Road
Ivanhoe VIC 3079
Ph. 03) 9486 5966

Email: reception@freedomchinesemedicine.com
https://www.facebook.com/freedomchinesemedicine

*For acupuncture consultation fee only, for any duration.

 

Reference

Published online 2015 Aug 5. doi:  10.1155/2015/260620

 

Can acupuncture help Arthritis?

Yes! Arthritis is a common health complaint and here at Freedom Chinese Medicine, we help people who suffer from this sometimes debilitating illness, on a daily basis, with excellent results.

We have seen people who have tried every other available treatment with no success, walk out of the clinic with a renewed sense of wellbeing and hope for recovery. I have seen people with even the most severe cases of arthritis enjoy significant freedom from pain.

This is one of the great joys of being a Chinese medicine practitioner.

If you try our treatment process, some of the results you a likely to enjoy are:

• reduction of pain
• improvement in mobility
• reduction of swelling
• increased strength in joints and muscles

What is Arthritis?

Arthritis is an umbrella diagnosis that covers many conditions, including:

• Osteoarthritis
• Rheumatoid arthritis
• Gout
• Ankylosing spondylitis
• Juvenile arthritis
• Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus)
• Scleroderma
• Post-trauma arthritis

However, put simply, it can be classified as ongoing stiffness, inflammation, pain and sometimes even deformity of joints.

How do you know if you have arthritis?

Two of the most common complaints that people come into our clinic are for knee and neck arthritis. If you are having trouble with these areas, or any others for that matter, it is a good idea to make an appointment to have a treatment and assessment with one of our experienced Chinese medicine practitioners. They will look for common complaints such as:

• pain or tenderness in any joints
• decreased mobility and range of motion
• stiffness, especially stiffness that is effected by weather changes
• swelling of the joints
• reduced strength
• bony outgrowths.

Tips to manage arthritis

1. Omega 3 supplementation

DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) can reduce the proliferation of chemicals inflammation, the causes of pain and swelling in arthritis.

2. Glucosamine & chondroitin sulfate supplementation:

Two integral components of cartilage are Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate. These are building blocks for new cartilage growth

3. Avoiding foods that encourage inflammation:

• Sugar
• Trans fats
• Saturated fats
• Foods containing Omega 6 fatty acids
• Refined carbohydrates
• MSG
• Gluten and Casein (for those with gluten intolerance or Ceolics disease)
• Aspartame

Reference to support above statement: https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/arthritis-diet/foods-to-avoid-limit/food-ingredients-and-inflammation-12.php

4. Eat more foods that are beneficial for your joint health such as…

• Tuna
• Mackerel
• Herring.
• Red beans
• Kidney beans
• Pinto beans
• Salmon
• Fresh garlic
• Soybeans
• Walnut oil
• Safflower oil
• Avocado oil
• Extra virgin olive oil
• Cherries
• Broccoli
• Green tea
• Oranges
• Grapefruits
• Limes
• Walnuts
• Pine nuts
• Pistachios
• Almonds

 

Reference to support above statement: https: https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/arthritis-diet/best-foods-for-arthritis/

5. Stretch and move!

The old adage ‘use it or lose it’ applies here. Often our worst enemy can be a modern, sedentary lifestyle. Joints need circulation, muscles need to shorten and lengthen and tendons and ligaments need activity in order to stay strong.

Even a simple, gently daily stretching routine can be of great benefit. Yoga, under the guidance of a properly trained health care professional, is an ancient and wonderfully gentle path that has stood the test of time for not only joint health, but overall wellbeing as well.

Proof acupuncture works for arthritis!
Across 18 high quality studies involving 18,000 participants, acupuncture was shown to relieve pain by about 50%.

Reference to support above statement: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/acupuncture-is-worth-a-try-for-chronic-pain-201304016042

Acupuncture is not only a well-known way to relieve pain in people, animals are also receiving the benefits of this ancient practice. Would you believe acupuncture has been successfully tried on giraffes? The Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, Rhode Island, is one of the first places to use acupuncture on a giraffe.

A nearly 2,000-pound patient named Sukari suffers from arthritis. Click here to see her getting an acupuncture treatment.

If you’d like to try Acupuncture to see if it helps your arthritis. Contact us on 9486 5966 or click here to book online. Have your appointment by 15th April, 2018 & mention this offer to receive a $20 discount. 

Article written by:

Dr. Roy Hughson

Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture & Cosmetic Acupuncture

Roy Hughson has completed an Acupuncture degree here in Melbourne at the Australian College of Natural Medicine and is a fully registered Chinese Medicine practitioner. He is also a qualified Yoga instructor and long term meditation practitioner.

In his treatments, Roy infuses Chinese medicine with contemporary holistic approaches to achieve a healthier, happier and more deeply connected state of being in his patients.

Over the past 7 years of busy clinical practice, Roy has accumulated a breadth of experience in treating anxiety and depressive disorders, fertility challenges, paediatrics, chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, insomnia, musculoskeletal issues, dermatological (including extensive experience with alopecia and acne) disorders and many others. He is also very passionate about the role that modern natural medicine can play in supporting those going through a cancer journey.

Pumpkin, leek & spinach quiche


To Prep: 10 mins
To Cook: 45 mins

Ingredients: 11

Difficulty: Easy

Servings: 4

 

Ingredients:

700g butternut pumpkin, peeled, cut into 2cm pieces

Olive Oil Spray

1 leek, pale section only, halved lengthways, washed, dried, thinly sliced crossways

2 garlic cloves, crushed

100g baby spinach leaves

4 eggs

2 egg whites

60ml (1/4 cup) skim milk

80g (1/3 cup) fresh low-fat ricotta

1/3 cup fresh basil leaves

Mixed salad leaves (optional), to serve

 

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Line a large baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Place the pumpkin on the lined tray and spray with olive oil spray. Season with pepper. Bake in oven for 25 minutes or until golden.
  2. Meanwhile, heat a large non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Spray lightly with olive oil spray to grease. Add the leek and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes or until soft. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 minute or until soft. Add the spinach and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes or until the spinach just wilts.
  1. Line a 26 x 16cm (base measurement) slab pan with non-stick baking paper. Spread the pumpkin and leek mixture evenly over the base of the pan.
  1. Whisk together the eggs, egg whites and milk in a jug. Pour egg mixture evenly over pumpkin and leek mixture. Sprinkle evenly with ricotta. Bake for 20 minutes or until puffed and golden. Sprinkle with the basil. Serve with mixed salad leaves, if desired.

Moisturising Tea

This tea helps to moisturise dry skin & airways, from the inside out. It can also help a sore throat.

The Moisturising Tea is available at Freedom Chinese Medicine and contains:

● Xue Er (snow fungus) – contains iron, Vitamin C, calcium, phosphorous. Contains immune stimulants to fight chronic infections, promotes anti-tumor activities, protects the liver and decreases inflammation. Xue Er is traditionally used in Chinese Medicine to hydrate and nourish the lungs, ease dry cough and decrease inflammation (heat) in the lungs.

● Nan Xing Ren (Southern apricot kernels) – is used in Chinese Medicine to stop cough and calm wheezing. It reduces sore throats and can also assist in regulating bowel movements. Research has shown that Nan Xing Ren can inhibit the respiratory centre to stop cough and calm wheezing. It reduces the level of blood triglycerides, reduces inflammation and pain and contains anti-tumor properties. Nan Xing Ren is non-toxic when properly prepared.

● Bai He (Lily Bulb) – is used in Chinese Medicine to stop cough, hydrate the respiratory and digestive systems, reduce lung inflammation and calm the spirit. Research has shown that Bai He contains small amounts of calcium,
phosphorus and iron. They also contain Vitamins B1, B2 and C.

● Chen Pi (Tangerine peel) is used in Chinese Medicine to assist the digestive system. It also stops cough and dissolves phlegm. Research suggests that Chen Pi has mild properties, as an expectorant, antiemetic, anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory.

● Hong Zao (Chinese Red Dates, Jujube) commonly used in Chinese cooking to add a subtle sweetness in savoury dishes. These dates are used to tonify Qi, improve Blood quality, and calm the spirit.

Ingredients (in packets sold at Freedom Chinese Medicine for $14):
Xue Er (snow fungus) – 2 pieces
Nan Xing Ren (apricot kernels) – 20gm
Hong Zao (Chinese red dates) – 3 pieces
Bai He (lily bulbs) – 20gm
Chen Pi (tangerine peel) – 1 piece

Ingredients (add at home):
1x pear (preferably nashi pear) cut into pieces, core removed and
skin on
1L of water
Sugar or Stevia to taste

Method:

1. Soak the dried snow fungus in warm water until it is
completely covered. Let it sit for about 15 minutes until it has
become soft and large. Using a pair of scissors, cut it quarters
while removing the hard yellow middle.

2. In a separate bowl, soak in warm water the dried tangerine
peel for 5 minutes.

3. Once the tangerine peel softens, using the face of a knife,
scrape off the darker side of the peel (this is the bitter part)
just slightly.

4. Start to boil your tea water

5. When the water boils, add all the dried snow pear, apricot
kernels, tangerine peel, dried dates, dried lily bulbs together.

6. Boil on medium heat for 1 hour.

7. Serve and enjoy! Ideal to drink hot.

Pork Goulash with Mushroom Pilaf

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Pork Goulash with Mushroom Pilaf

Serves 4

Mushroom pilaf

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 brown onion, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 cup basmati rice, rinsed

1 ½ cup chicken stock

200g button mushrooms, thinly sliced

Pork Goulash

1 tbsp olive oil

1 brown onion, halved, thinly sliced

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tbsp paprika

600g pork fillets, thinly sliced

2 tbsp brandy

1 cup chicken stock

½ cup thickened cream

¼ cup flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped

Method

  • 1. Make mushroom pilaf: Heat 1 tbsp oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic. Cook, stirring, for 4-5 mins until soft. Add rice and stir to combine. Pour over stock and season with pepper. Stir to combine. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, covered, for 12-15mins or until rice has absorbed stock. Heat remaining 1 tbsp oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Cook mushrooms for 3-4 mins or until just tender. Transfer to a bowl. Cover and set aside.
  • 2. Meanwhile, heat oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic. Cook for 4-5 minutes or until soft. Add paprika and cook, stirring for 1 minute. Add pork and cook, stirring occasionally, for 4-5 minutes or until just browned.
  • 3. Add brandy and stock to pan. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer, uncovered, for 10-15 minutes or until liquid has reduced by half. Stir through cream and cook for a further 4 -5 minutes or until heated through. Remove from heat and stir through parsley.
  • 4. Stir mushrooms into pilaf. Spoon pilaf onto serving plates. Top with goulash and serve.

Pear & Walnut Tart

Here’s one for your weekend baking inspiration!  Refined sugar & wheat free!

PEAR & WALNUT TART 
Recipe by http://www.sweeterlifeclub.com/recipes/pear-walnut-tart/

pear & walnut tart
Ingredients

230g wholemeal spelt flour
½ cup Natvia (plus 2 tsp extra)
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
60g chopped walnuts
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/3 cup oil
2/3 cup low fat Greek yoghurt
2 medium sized pears
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon Natvia icing mix

Method

Preheat oven to 190°C and spray a removable bottom quiche dish with oil.
Combine flour, Natvia, baking powder, cinnamon and walnuts in a medium bowl.
Blend vanilla, oil and yoghurt and add to dry mixture to form a dough.
Press dough into prepared dish. Loosely cover with cling wrap and, using a small glass, press the pastry out evenly over the base and sides.
Cut pears in half, then thinly slice them from top to bottom. Arrange the large pieces overlapping around the outer edge of pie base and the smaller ones in the centre.
Sprinkle over the 2 teaspoon Natvia Icing mix, dust with 1 tsp cinnamon and bake for 25-30 minutes.
Dust with more cinnamon and icing mix and serve with low fat custard or yoghurt

Homemade Electrolyte Drink

This drink helps to change the chemistry of your body tissue to help you absorb fluids and hydrate better. So many patients we’re seeing lately are thirsty, drinking a lot and not hydrating..

What’s in Typical Electrolyte Drinks?

The strawberry-flavored Pedialyte one-liter container has the following ingredients: Water, Dextrose, Citric Acid, Potassium Citrate, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Citrate, Natural Flavor, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Zinc Gluconate, Red 40 and Blue 1.

And sports drinks like Gatorade contain other harmful ingredients such as brominated vegetable oils along with refined sugars and artificial colours.

What Are Electrolytes and Why Do We Need Them?

In a nutshell, electrolytes are basically salts – specifically the ions in salt. According to Discovery Health, “electrolytes are important because they are what your cells (especially nerve, heart, muscle) use to maintain voltages across their cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses (nerve impulses, muscle contractions) across themselves and to other cells.”

Furthermore, when kids get the stomach flu or have diarrhea or vomiting, they lose electrolytes and need to replenish them. The same goes for kids (and adults) who exercise a lot – they lose electrolytes (specifically sodium and potassium) through sweat.1

The major electrolytes in the body include: sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, phosphate and sulfate.2

Homemade Electrolyte Drink Recipe

From dontmesswithmama.com

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1-2 servings

 

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 cups of water (filtered or purified) or raw coconut water
  • 2 tbsp organic raw honey or organic maple syrup
  • 1/8 tsp Himalayan Pink salt or Celtic sea salt (I like Himalayan better – it has 84 trace minerals)

Instructions

  1. Put all ingredients in a blender and blend well.
  2. Store in Mason jars or reusable glass cap bottles.

Enjoy!

 

Footnotes: 1, 2, “What Are Electrolytes?”, Discovery Health.

5 Ways to Ease Fatigue

Are you waking up in the morning feeling tired and heavy, like you haven’t had any sleep? Are you feeling drained in the afternoon? Is coffee the only thing getting you out of the house in the morning?

Fatigue, lethargy, tiredness are an increasing issue. I can help. And so may the advice to follow..

I believe our modern fast paced lifestyle can claim some of the blame.

We wake up suddenly to our alarm clock, our heart starts racing from the initial shock. We stumble and stagger with bleary eyes toward the coffee machine for our caffeine hit to provide us with a false blast of energy, just so we can make it to the shower to begin getting ourselves ready for the work ahead, be it paid work or the duties of looking after a family. We stumble back home and stay up way too late watching TV or other screens, under the illusion we are “winding down”. Only to wake in the morning feeling more exhausted. We tend to pass it off as “getting older”.

fatigue low immunity

Poor sleep quality, improper nutritional intake, too many commitments, and not enough down time all add to the feeling of exhaustion.

 

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has treatments used for millennia to increase our energy. TCM has this fundamental concept of Qi, which very loosely translates as energy, but more to do with a life force behind everything we intake, create and release. Our Qi likes to move freely and smoothly. Many things in our modern life consume, stagnate or fail to cultivate and nurture our Qi:

  • Emotions can block our qi from moving freely
  • Poor sleep habits fail to adequately provide us with rest which is vital in rebuilding our qi
  • Poor dietary habits fail to cultivate and can even consume our qi
  • Excess work and sexual activity and alcohol consumption all drain our qi
  • Long-term illness can remain trapped in our bodies depleting us

All of these things can lead to us feeling fatigued.

Tips for combating fatigue

  1. Sleep

First and foremost importance in energy replenishment and cultivation is to rest well. Deep restful sleep is critical in combating fatigue.

Many people have poor sleeping habits of going to bed late, staying up late watching TV/computer then turning off and expecting to get too sleep straight away. Melatonin is our sleep hormone, which is only turned on an hour, or two after the photoreceptors in our eyes recognize that darkness has fallen. Think of last time you went camping, an hour or two after sunset we start feeling sleepy as we don’t have artificial light tricking our minds into thinking it is still daylight.

Getting into better sleeping habits includes not having stimulates such as caffeine or alcohol in afternoon or night. And not taking in too many fluids at all after 6 pm so we don’t wake in the night to urinate and disturb sleep.

Practicing a “wind down ritual” at night like breathing exercises, stretching, meditation to prepare our minds and body for sleep.

2. Waking

Begin waking every morning and gently mobilising the body with stretching, tai qi, or Qi gong practice to wake the body softly and begin circulating qi and blood to the joints and muscles.

When we sleep, TCM theory believes the qi and blood retreat into the organs, joints and muscle tissue to repair and clean any damage or build up from the day. Just like warming up a car in the morning, we need to wake and warm our internal qi before beginning our day.

 

3. Fuel

After waking the body we need to feed the body.

TCM has an old saying “Eat breakfast like an emperor, lunch like a king and dinner like a beggar”. This is because TCM theory believes breakfast should be the most nutritious and hearty meal of the day to fuel us for the day ahead, lunch should be filling enough to fuel the afternoon, and dinner should be the smallest meal, this is because at night the body doesn’t require much energy instead it shifts its focus on cleaning, repairing and regenerating the internal cells and tissues of the body.

4. Check in

Take time out during your day to check in with yourself and see if you are overdoing it. Allow yourself a few minutes to stop, close your eyes, and do some restorative breathing techniques. This can assist you to recharge yourself at regular intervals to help minimise fatigue.

 

5. TCM tools for treating fatigue

  • Acupuncture

TCM theory states that acupuncture can help the organs to build or cultivate qi, move qi that becomes stagnant in the body so it can flow freely and feed our movement and function.

  • Massage/Acupressure

Can assist in moving the stuck energy in our muscles and joints to circulate freely again.

  • Herbal medicine

Used for thousands of years to regulate the production, flow and balance of energy in the body

  • Vitamin supplements

Many processes in the body require adequate levels of vitamins and minerals in the body. If the dietary intake is low short- term supplementation can assist in energy production.

  • Cupping therapy

Cupping can release stagnation of energy and blood in the body helping to relieve tiredness from toxicity in the tissues.

  • Tai Qi/Qi gong

Much more than just breathing techniques. These traditional tools of TCM can help circulate and cultivate the energy in the body. Moving stagnation of energy to a place of pain or weakness with the mind and breath.

  • Meditation

Restorative and calming it can help you focus the mind and quiet the chatter to help restore the qi.

We provide all of the above treatments & products here at Freedom Chinese Medicine. And we have several practitioners who have a particular passion & experience for helping people with fatigue:

Dr. Jason Callanan

Dr. Roy Hughson

Dr. Christine Lee

Click here to read more about these excellent practitioners.

This article written by:

Dr Jason Callanan

Chinese Medical Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Massage Therapist

Jason has been practising Traditional Chinese Medicine for more than 10 years. In addition to his Acupuncture degree, he has also completed a Masters in Chinese Herbal Medicine.

Jason has also studied massage styles including Acupressure, remedial techniques, Trigger Point Therapy, and trained in Shiatsu under the private instruction of a Japanese Master. He has incorporated these massage techniques into his clinical practice of Acupuncture to achieve maximum benefit for his patients.

Jason was first introduced to Acupuncture more than 25 years ago when he received treatment for a back injury he was told would need surgery; instead he received six sessions of acupuncture which successfully resolved the issue. Following this experience, he developed a strong passion and interest in Chinese Medicine.

His treatments may include Acupuncture, Massage, Chinese Herbal Medicine, nutritional support, exercise advice… to treat illness, as well as maintaining wellness and vitality.

Jason is an experienced, caring and enthusiastic practitioner with a strong interest in musculo-skeletal issues, digestive health, and the restoration of emotional well-being and balance.

Jason is available:

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday
Call (03) 9486 5966

Natural Relief for Back Pain

Do you get pain getting up and down from a seated position? Is your sleep affected because you can’t get comfortable? Don’t worry, you are not alone. It is estimated up to 16% of the Australian population suffer with back pain, lower back pain being the most common.¹

If you experience long-term back pain you are very well aware of how debilitating it can be. With many people having to take time off work or caring for their families because the pain is too great.

In clinic, I believe the two significant factors associated with back pain are- muscle tension causing misalignment of hips and spine, and inflammatory conditions which result in aggravation of the surrounding soft tissue.

What can aggravate your back pain?

  • Sitting for long periods of time with poor posture
  • Lack of regular gentle exercise
  • Incorrect lifting techniques
  • Tension of the muscles of the back and legs
  • Magnesium deficiency can cause muscle spasm

How can YOU treat your back pain?

1. Check your sleeping posture

If you are waking in the morning with pain in your back, there is a strong possibility your sleep posture can be adding to your discomfort. In clinic I find the majority of people favour lay on one side with their bottom leg straight and their top leg bent at around 90 deg. This causes significant rotation in the pelvis whilst you are sleeping adding to tension one side of the spine. Try putting a small pillow or cushion between your knees and bending both knees at the same level. This will help to keep your pelvis and spine in a neutral position and provide relief for those lower back muscles.

2. Stretching

Releasing the tension in our muscles alongside our spine can go a long way to relieving back pain. I often tell my patients if you imagine your spine is like a tent pole, and your muscles are like the ropes holding it in position. If you tighten one side of the ropes you will pull the pole over. The spine is the same. Tight muscles pull at all our joints and can be responsible for a lot of misalignment of the joint space. Regular gentle stretching can provide relief for this tension.

Don’t forget the legs, particularly hamstrings, as they track from the back of our knees and attach to base of pelvis. If these are tight it can rotate our hips and put pressure on our lower back muscles.
Classes guided by an experienced therapist in Yoga, Clinical Pilates, Tai Qi and Qi gong can all provide you with knowledge so you can practice at home. We have Yoga, Qi Gong & Tai Chi classes here at Freedom Chinese Medicine.

I recommend daily practice in the morning after a light walk, and just before you go to bed to help you release tension that may have built up during the day.

Treatments available for back pain

Acupuncture has been used for thousands of years to treat a multitude of conditions and pain is a very common issue found in our clinic. Many studies have shown that Acupuncture has an analgesic (pain killing) effect to reduce discomfort and give patients back their freedom of movement. More than just pain relief Acupuncture techniques focus on the treating the inflammation and muscle tension that can occur with back issues.
A study was conducted in Melbourne hospitals showing that Acupuncture can be just as effective as opioid medications for all types of pain, without harmful side effects.²

Massage therapy has many very effective techniques for releasing muscle tension and stimulating blood flow to resolve the pain associated with back issues.

Herbs and supplements– Chinese herbal medicine has a history of treating pain conditions with herbs by stimulating blood flow to the area affected, relaxing muscles and moving the blockage of energy that accompanies back pain.
Vitamin and mineral supplementation particularly regular intake of magnesium can assist in getting tense and tight muscles to relax and switch off.³

We provide all of the above treatments here at Freedom Chinese Medicine. And we have several practitioners who have a particular passion & experience for helping people with back pain:

Dr. Jason Callanan

Dr. Daniel Gibbs

Dr. Roy Hughson

Dr. Christine Lee

Click here to read more about these excellent practitioners.

This article written by:

Dr Jason Callanan

Chinese Medical Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Massage Therapist

Jason has been practising Traditional Chinese Medicine for more than 10 years. In addition to his Acupuncture degree, he has also completed a Masters in Chinese Herbal Medicine.

Jason has also studied massage styles including Acupressure, remedial techniques, Trigger Point Therapy, and trained in Shiatsu under the private instruction of a Japanese Master. He has incorporated these massage techniques into his clinical practice of Acupuncture to achieve maximum benefit for his patients.

Jason was first introduced to Acupuncture more than 25 years ago when he received treatment for a back injury he was told would need surgery; instead he received six sessions of acupuncture which successfully resolved the issue. Following this experience, he developed a strong passion and interest in Chinese Medicine.

His treatments may include Acupuncture, Massage, Chinese Herbal Medicine, nutritional support, exercise advice… to treat illness, as well as maintaining wellness and vitality.

Jason is an experienced, caring and enthusiastic practitioner with a strong interest in musculo-skeletal issues, digestive health, and the restoration of emotional well-being and balance.

Jason is available:

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday
Call (03) 9486 5966