Chinese Medicine for Cough Relief

Having a cough can really change your day, or night! And sometimes the standard remedies don’t help. We see many people in our clinic with shortness of breath, sore muscles, and tiredness from being woken by a coughing fit during the night. The most common causes of cough are smoking, asthma, acid reflux, post-nasal drip, and a common cold or flu that just won’t go away. In my clinical experience, many people present to the clinic with a cough after a recent personal loss too. Thankfully, we can often help cough, no matter what the cause.

Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture can help. Regardless of whether the cough is ongoing or recent. Dry or productive (phlegmy).  Chinese Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture addresses the underlying cause (or “root”) of the condition. Coughing is often considered a symptom (or “branch”) of a deeper condition in the body. The root and the branch conditions are what your Acupuncturist is assessing when they take your pulse and look at your tongue.

Your Chinese medicine appointment for cough

The use of acupuncture alone to moderate asthma in adult patients is supported by the recent findings of the Acupuncture Evidence Project. And the treatment of cough has a long history in Chinese Medicine.

Acupuncture can help you with your cough by:
– Relieving the cough
– Opening your airways more
– Loosening phlegm
– Relieving muscle pains that can follow a bout of coughing.

Your practitioner may also choose to use cupping therapy to relieve your cough by increasing blood circulation and encouraging phlegm to leave the lung. They may also prescribe Chinese herbal medicine, give you dietary advice, or provide you with herbal teas to treat the underlying cause of the cough.

It is important to really understand the reason that you are coughing. Without understanding the ‘why‘ it is difficult to treat the ‘what‘, and this is where you can really benefit from a practitioner assessing you.

We have 5 excellent Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture practitioners here at Freedom Chinese Medicine in Ivanhoe, Melbourne. Mention this article to receive $20 off your first session. To book, click here or call us on 03 9486 5966.

Written by Dr. Heather Dowall

Dr Heather Dowall

Acupuncturist

Dr  Heather Dowall is a warm, intuitive and enthusiastic practitioner. Heather graduated from Endeavour College of Natural Health with a Health Science degree majoring in Acupuncture.

Heather is passionate about fertility and pregnancy support, pain relief, cancer support, and providing relief for anyone experiencing anxiety, depression, emotional trauma or PTSD.

Mention this article to receive $20 off your first session. To book, click here or call us on 03 9486 5966.

 

References

Acupuncture Evidence Project (McDonald J, and Janz S, 2017). The full document (81 pages) is available from the Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association Ltd (AACMA) http://www.acupuncture.org.au.

Orange & Passion fruit Buckwheat Protein Pancakes

Ingredients

Pancakes
6 each Eggs
3 each Egg yolks
1/4 cup/30g/1oz Buckwheat flour
1/2 each Banana
1 tsp Natvia/ Stevia
1/4 tsp Baking soda
1 tbsp/20g/0.7 oz Greek yogurt
1 tbsp/7g/0.2oz Milled flaxseed
1 scoop Vanilla whey protein

Orange & Passion Fruit Greek Yogurt
1 small tub Total Fage Greek Yogurt
1 each Orange, Juiced and zested
1 tsp Natvia
2 each Passion fruit
Servings: 10 mini pancakes

Directions

Preheat Oven 180°.

Pancake batter – in a large mixing bowl add eggs, buckwheat flour, banana, Natvia, baking soda, greek yogurt, flaxseed and whey protein. Use an electric mixer to blend the pancake batter to a smooth, runny consistency.

Cooking – in a large frying pan add some coconut oil (1/4 tsp.) place egg rings on the pan, leave some space between them. Pour pancake batter into egg rings using ¼ cup measurement, don’t fill to the top, half fill the egg rings. Once you see bubbles forming remove from pan. Finish cooking in the oven. See next step.

Oven- on a lined, greased baking tray, place the egg ring on the tray and gently remove the pancake by gently pushing it out. Give it a quick wipe to remove the excess batter and repeat the process until pancake batter is completely gone.Regularly flip pancakes over in the oven to ensure they are cooked evenly.

Orange and Passion Fruit Greek Yogurt- in a mixing bowl add greek yogurt, juice of an orange, orange zest, natvia and passion fruit- stir until combined.

Viola – plate up and enjoy.

– See more at: http://www.sweeterlifeclub.com/recipes/orange-passion-fruit-buckwheat-protein-pancakes/#sthash.TDTQTOJ5.dpuf

Hay fever Prevention Is Now

Have you noticed the wattle blooms and flower blossoms lately? Have you seen the bare trees with buds forming? Do you feel that wind and occasional afternoon sunshine? Yup, Spring is around the corner.

Now is the best time to treat hay fever with Chinese Medicine & Acupuncture to prevent an itchy, sneezy springtime. That’s right. Before you have symptoms.

Want some more information and evidence? Here is some.

Did you suffer with hay fever last spring? Well you needn’t. We can help.

Click here to book online. Or call 9486 5966.

Beef, Vegetable & Barley Soup

Hearty & Nutritious!

Serves 8

Ingredients

2 tbs olive oil,

500g beef check steak, cut into 2 cm cubes

1 large onion, finely chopped

3 teaspoons sweet paprika

3 carrots, peeled, cut into 1 cm cubes

2 swede, peeled, cut into 1 cm cubes

2 sticks celery, thinly sliced diagonally

8 cups chicken stock

1 cup pearl barley

 

Method

  1. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large, deep saucepan over medium-high heat. Add beef (in batches if needed) and cook for 3-4 minutes or until browned. Transfer to a plate.
  2. Add remaining oil and onion to pan. Cook for 2-3 minutes or until tender. Add paprika and cook for 1 minute. Add carrots, swede, celery,, stock, 6 cups water, barley and beef. Bring to the boil. Skim any scum. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, for 75 – 90 mins or until tender. Season with salt and pepper.

Note: This soup is freezing friendly. Can freeze it for up to 3 months. Handy for a quick, filling meal in winter!

 

Slow-cooked Chicken Casserole

It’s a great time to use your slow cooker or crock pot. Here is an easy, tasty & healthy slow-cooker recipe. I’ve made this 2 weeks in a row, I just improvised with the vegies & flavours so they were different enough!

Serves 5-6

Ingredients:

1.5 kg chicken pieces

2 carrots, sliced

2 onions, sliced

2 stalks celery, sliced

salt & pepper to taste

1/2 cup chicken broth or white wine

3/4 teaspoon basil or oregano

Method:

Place half the carrots, onion and celery in the bottom of the slow cooker. Add the chicken, salt, pepper, liquid and remaining vegetables. Sprinkle with herbs. Cover and cook on (Auto) for 6-7 hours.

 

Acupuncture for IBS

Does your bowel seem irritable? Does it bloat, hurt, not empty properly, make you nauseas & constipated? Or do you have diarrhoea, frequent loose stools, urgency or frequency? Do you worry that your Irritable Bowel Syndrome will play up at that next outing, work meeting or social function? Does your gut make incredibly loud noises, seemingly at the worst possible times?

We can help you. We can determine the underlying cause of your digestive problem and treat it naturally with a holistic approach, whether it be by using diet changes, herbal medicine, acupuncture, stress management or a combination of therapies. A recent review of 6 statistically significant studies, from 1966 to 2013 found that Acupuncture has a 96.7% total effectiveness rate of treating IBS¹.

abdominal painAre you tired of being offered medications and solutions that only treat the symptoms momentarily before they reoccur again? With Chinese medicine you will get a holistic and individualised treatment tailored specifically to help you. That way your IBS gets better and stays better.

We can determine what type of IBS you have and the best way to remedy it. Using both acupuncture and herbs, the underlying imbalance which is causing your IBS can be addressed, so you could start to notice improvements within just one month. Leaving you to feel better and lighter, free of the burden of bowel symptoms.

wellnessAre you concerned that acupuncture may be painful or herbs might be difficult to take? Well, they aren’t. It’s much easier than what you’ve been experiencing. But don’t take my word for it, come in and try it yourself. The first 10 new patients who come in for an appointment and mention this article will receive 50% off their first session. What have you got to lose?

Contact the Clinic on 03 9486 5966 or click here to book online

Look forward to helping you soon,
Dr. Jason Callanan

Jason has been practising Traditional Chinese Medicine for more than 10 years. In addition to his Acupuncture degree, he has also completed a Masters in Chinese Herbal Medicine.

Jason was first introduced to Acupuncture more than 25 years ago when he received treatment for a back injury he was told would need surgery; instead he received six sessions of acupuncture which successfully resolved the issue. Following this experience, he developed a strong passion and interest in Chinese Medicine.

His treatments may include Acupuncture, Massage, Chinese Herbal Medicine, nutritional support, exercise advice… to treat illness, as well as maintaining wellness and vitality.

Jason is an experienced, caring and enthusiastic practitioner with a strong interest in musculo-skeletal issues, digestive health, and the restoration of emotional well-being and balance.

Jason is available on Mondays, Tuesdays & Thursdays at Freedom Chinese Medicine in Ivanhoe, Melbourne. Contact the Clinic on 03 9486 5966 or click here to book online

 

References

1. Orloff, S. (2014). Acupuncture Proven effective for treating IBS Symptoms. World Journal of Gastroenterology.

Home

http://www.traditionalacupuncture.com.au/digestive-health/irritable-bowel syndrome/?gclid=CPemm8Wp0sQCFYQDvAodpx4AZw

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/irritable_bowel_syndrome

 

Warming Herbal Tea

Does winter chill you to the bone? Warm yourself with ginger and cinnamon,
or make a Chai (instructions in packet available at Freedom Chinese Medicine)

Ginger and cinnamon are very warming. They can be added (in small portions) to slow cooked stews, soups and broths.  According to Chinese medicine, fresh ginger brings the body’s heat to the
skin’s surface. It invigorates the immune system and helps us feel protected from the winter’s chill. Dried ginger produces a much stronger, more intense
heat. Cinnamon warms from within, and is especially helpful for people who suffer from pain in the lower back and cold arms and legs during winter.

Winter Warming Tea packets & recipe available in store at Freedom Chinese Medicine for $11.50.

Contact us on 9486 5966 if you’d like us to put some aside for you.

Sugar Free Rhubarb & Apple Pie

apple pie

By: Bark Time

Ingredients

For the pastry:
1 1/3 cup/200g/7oz All purpose flour
200g/7oz unsalted butter, cubed
5 tbsp/ Natvia
1 ea Egg yolk
1/2 tsp baking powder
3 drops Vanilla essence
For the filling:
350g/ Rhubarb
350g Apples
1 tbsp/14g/0.5oz Natvia
1 tsp Cinnamon
Few handfuls of desiccated coconut

Directions

1. Sift the flour Into a large mixing bowl add the Natvia sweetener and combine, add the baking powder and vanilla essence and finally add the cubed butter. Bring all the ingredients together and add the egg yolk. Once you have a smooth and even pastry for our base split it into two halves and place in the fridge to settle.
2. Preheat the oven to 160C.
3. Wash and peel the rhubarb and apples, then trim the rhubarb and core/deseed the apples. Once cleaned up then chop them all up into small cubes.
4. Place them in a saucepan, add Natvia sweetener and cinnamon and gently cook until the fruit becomes soft, stir gently as you don’t want to turn the fruit into a mush.
5. Remove from the heat and put aside.
6. Prepare a small cake frame (around 12” X 12”) by lining with baking paper. Retrieve one half of your pastry from the fridge. Fill the bottom of your baking trey with a thin layer of the pastry either by rolling it out (if you are adept with a rolling pin) or just by patching piece by piece with your fingers (if you are not) – your pastry should be very easy to work with so this isn’t difficult.
7. Next cover your pastry with a thin layer of desiccated coconut then on top of your coconut layer spoon some of the stewed fruit filling; then again cover with a thin layer of desiccated coconut.
8. Take the second half of your pastry from the fridge so it is as chilled as it can be and using the “big eyes” on your grater grate all over the top.
9. Pop it into the oven and allow to cook for 30-35 minutes or until a nice golden colour.
10. Remove from the oven and allow to cool.
11. Sprinkle with Natvia sweetener to give it a nice dusted finishing look. Enjoy!

Spice Roasted Cauliflower With Quinoa

The dish makes a great side for roasted chicken or fish simply seared with lemon and garlic. Or, bring leftovers to work for a healthy lunch.

The recipe is endlessly adaptable. You can sub in 2 Tbsp. lemon juice for the preserved lemon, and also play around with other herbs and spices like mint, coriander and cinnamon.

Ingredients

1 head cauliflower, separated into small florets
2 Tbsp. olive oil
1 Tbsp. za’atar
1 tsp. cumin
¼ tsp. red pepper flakes or 1 tsp. Aleppo pepper flakes
2 cloves garlic with skins on
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained
1 2/3 cup water
3 Tbsp. finely chopped preserved lemon rind (flesh removed before chopping rind)
3 Tbsp. golden raisins
3 Tbsp. toasted, chopped hazelnuts, pine nuts or sliced almonds
handful cilantro leaves, chopped
Optional: drizzle of plain yogurt and/or pomegranate molasses

Method

Preheat oven to 425 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a bowl, combine cauliflower, olive oil, spices, and a good dusting of salt and pepper.

Spread on baking sheet and add garlic cloves. Bake for 35-40 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes to get the cauliflower evenly browned.

Meanwhile, bring water to a boil in saucepan, then reduce heat and add quinoa. Cover and simmer 15 minutes until liquid is evaporated.

Remove cauliflower from oven. Remove garlic cloves and let cool. Once cooled, squeeze garlic from skins and mince or mash with a fork.

In a large bowl, fold together cauliflower, garlic, quinoa, preserved lemon and pine nuts. Garnish with cilantro, and perhaps some yogurt and pomegranate molasses. Tastes great served warm or room temperature. Serves 6-8 as a side dish.

Harira – Morroccan chickpea and lentil soup

 

Harira is served during Ramadan as the first dish at the ‘breaking of the fast’ when the sun goes down. It is found on Morroccan menus all through the year, a perennial favourite that is varied from one household to another. It is hearty and delicious and seems to fulfil every need we have from food.

Here is a simple version.

Ingredients:

  • 2 onions, diced
  • 2 celery sticks, diced
  • 1 carrot, diced
  • 500gm of chicken thigh, diced (optional) and seasoned
  • 1 pinch of saffron thread, soaked in warm water
  • 1 can of chickpeas
  • ¼ cup French lentils
  • 2 cans of whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 2cm knob of ginger, grated
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 litre of stock (veg or chicken)
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 handful of coriander, chopped

Method:

  1. In the soup pot, brown the chicken lightly and remove
  2. Sweat the onions and then add vegetables.
  3. Add spices including saffron
  4. Add stock, tomatoes, French lentils and chickpeas. Bring to the boil and simmer for 20 minutes
  5. Add chicken and simmer for a further 10 minutes
  6. Add lemon juice
  7. Serve in bowls with coriander on top

Recipe by:

Dr Christine Lee

Acupuncturist & Chinese Herbalist

Dr Christine Lee has been practising as an acupuncturist and a Chinese herbalist since 2008. She graduated RMIT with a double degree in Applied Science (Chinese Medicine and Human Biology) and has completed further studies and a hospital internship in Nanjing, China.