Homemade Electrolyte Drink

This drink helps to change the chemistry of your body tissue to help you absorb fluids and hydrate better. So many patients we’re seeing lately are thirsty, drinking a lot and not hydrating..

What’s in Typical Electrolyte Drinks?

The strawberry-flavored Pedialyte one-liter container has the following ingredients: Water, Dextrose, Citric Acid, Potassium Citrate, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Citrate, Natural Flavor, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium, Zinc Gluconate, Red 40 and Blue 1.

And sports drinks like Gatorade contain other harmful ingredients such as brominated vegetable oils along with refined sugars and artificial colours.

What Are Electrolytes and Why Do We Need Them?

In a nutshell, electrolytes are basically salts – specifically the ions in salt. According to Discovery Health, “electrolytes are important because they are what your cells (especially nerve, heart, muscle) use to maintain voltages across their cell membranes and to carry electrical impulses (nerve impulses, muscle contractions) across themselves and to other cells.”

Furthermore, when kids get the stomach flu or have diarrhea or vomiting, they lose electrolytes and need to replenish them. The same goes for kids (and adults) who exercise a lot – they lose electrolytes (specifically sodium and potassium) through sweat.1

The major electrolytes in the body include: sodium, potassium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, phosphate and sulfate.2

Homemade Electrolyte Drink Recipe

From dontmesswithmama.com

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1-2 servings

 

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 cups of water (filtered or purified) or raw coconut water
  • 2 tbsp organic raw honey or organic maple syrup
  • 1/8 tsp Himalayan Pink salt or Celtic sea salt (I like Himalayan better – it has 84 trace minerals)

Instructions

  1. Put all ingredients in a blender and blend well.
  2. Store in Mason jars or reusable glass cap bottles.

Enjoy!

 

Footnotes: 1, 2, “What Are Electrolytes?”, Discovery Health.

5 Ways to Ease Fatigue

Are you waking up in the morning feeling tired and heavy, like you haven’t had any sleep? Are you feeling drained in the afternoon? Is coffee the only thing getting you out of the house in the morning?

Fatigue, lethargy, tiredness are an increasing issue. I can help. And so may the advice to follow..

I believe our modern fast paced lifestyle can claim some of the blame.

We wake up suddenly to our alarm clock, our heart starts racing from the initial shock. We stumble and stagger with bleary eyes toward the coffee machine for our caffeine hit to provide us with a false blast of energy, just so we can make it to the shower to begin getting ourselves ready for the work ahead, be it paid work or the duties of looking after a family. We stumble back home and stay up way too late watching TV or other screens, under the illusion we are “winding down”. Only to wake in the morning feeling more exhausted. We tend to pass it off as “getting older”.

fatigue low immunity

Poor sleep quality, improper nutritional intake, too many commitments, and not enough down time all add to the feeling of exhaustion.

 

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has treatments used for millennia to increase our energy. TCM has this fundamental concept of Qi, which very loosely translates as energy, but more to do with a life force behind everything we intake, create and release. Our Qi likes to move freely and smoothly. Many things in our modern life consume, stagnate or fail to cultivate and nurture our Qi:

  • Emotions can block our qi from moving freely
  • Poor sleep habits fail to adequately provide us with rest which is vital in rebuilding our qi
  • Poor dietary habits fail to cultivate and can even consume our qi
  • Excess work and sexual activity and alcohol consumption all drain our qi
  • Long-term illness can remain trapped in our bodies depleting us

All of these things can lead to us feeling fatigued.

Tips for combating fatigue

  1. Sleep

First and foremost importance in energy replenishment and cultivation is to rest well. Deep restful sleep is critical in combating fatigue.

Many people have poor sleeping habits of going to bed late, staying up late watching TV/computer then turning off and expecting to get too sleep straight away. Melatonin is our sleep hormone, which is only turned on an hour, or two after the photoreceptors in our eyes recognize that darkness has fallen. Think of last time you went camping, an hour or two after sunset we start feeling sleepy as we don’t have artificial light tricking our minds into thinking it is still daylight.

Getting into better sleeping habits includes not having stimulates such as caffeine or alcohol in afternoon or night. And not taking in too many fluids at all after 6 pm so we don’t wake in the night to urinate and disturb sleep.

Practicing a “wind down ritual” at night like breathing exercises, stretching, meditation to prepare our minds and body for sleep.

2. Waking

Begin waking every morning and gently mobilising the body with stretching, tai qi, or Qi gong practice to wake the body softly and begin circulating qi and blood to the joints and muscles.

When we sleep, TCM theory believes the qi and blood retreat into the organs, joints and muscle tissue to repair and clean any damage or build up from the day. Just like warming up a car in the morning, we need to wake and warm our internal qi before beginning our day.

 

3. Fuel

After waking the body we need to feed the body.

TCM has an old saying “Eat breakfast like an emperor, lunch like a king and dinner like a beggar”. This is because TCM theory believes breakfast should be the most nutritious and hearty meal of the day to fuel us for the day ahead, lunch should be filling enough to fuel the afternoon, and dinner should be the smallest meal, this is because at night the body doesn’t require much energy instead it shifts its focus on cleaning, repairing and regenerating the internal cells and tissues of the body.

4. Check in

Take time out during your day to check in with yourself and see if you are overdoing it. Allow yourself a few minutes to stop, close your eyes, and do some restorative breathing techniques. This can assist you to recharge yourself at regular intervals to help minimise fatigue.

 

5. TCM tools for treating fatigue

  • Acupuncture

TCM theory states that acupuncture can help the organs to build or cultivate qi, move qi that becomes stagnant in the body so it can flow freely and feed our movement and function.

  • Massage/Acupressure

Can assist in moving the stuck energy in our muscles and joints to circulate freely again.

  • Herbal medicine

Used for thousands of years to regulate the production, flow and balance of energy in the body

  • Vitamin supplements

Many processes in the body require adequate levels of vitamins and minerals in the body. If the dietary intake is low short- term supplementation can assist in energy production.

  • Cupping therapy

Cupping can release stagnation of energy and blood in the body helping to relieve tiredness from toxicity in the tissues.

  • Tai Qi/Qi gong

Much more than just breathing techniques. These traditional tools of TCM can help circulate and cultivate the energy in the body. Moving stagnation of energy to a place of pain or weakness with the mind and breath.

  • Meditation

Restorative and calming it can help you focus the mind and quiet the chatter to help restore the qi.

We provide all of the above treatments & products here at Freedom Chinese Medicine. And we have several practitioners who have a particular passion & experience for helping people with fatigue:

Dr. Jason Callanan

Dr. Roy Hughson

Dr. Christine Lee

Click here to read more about these excellent practitioners.

This article written by:

Dr Jason Callanan

Chinese Medical Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Massage Therapist

Jason has been practising Traditional Chinese Medicine for more than 10 years. In addition to his Acupuncture degree, he has also completed a Masters in Chinese Herbal Medicine.

Jason has also studied massage styles including Acupressure, remedial techniques, Trigger Point Therapy, and trained in Shiatsu under the private instruction of a Japanese Master. He has incorporated these massage techniques into his clinical practice of Acupuncture to achieve maximum benefit for his patients.

Jason was first introduced to Acupuncture more than 25 years ago when he received treatment for a back injury he was told would need surgery; instead he received six sessions of acupuncture which successfully resolved the issue. Following this experience, he developed a strong passion and interest in Chinese Medicine.

His treatments may include Acupuncture, Massage, Chinese Herbal Medicine, nutritional support, exercise advice… to treat illness, as well as maintaining wellness and vitality.

Jason is an experienced, caring and enthusiastic practitioner with a strong interest in musculo-skeletal issues, digestive health, and the restoration of emotional well-being and balance.

Jason is available:

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday
Call (03) 9486 5966

Natural Relief for Back Pain

Do you get pain getting up and down from a seated position? Is your sleep affected because you can’t get comfortable? Don’t worry, you are not alone. It is estimated up to 16% of the Australian population suffer with back pain, lower back pain being the most common.¹

If you experience long-term back pain you are very well aware of how debilitating it can be. With many people having to take time off work or caring for their families because the pain is too great.

In clinic, I believe the two significant factors associated with back pain are- muscle tension causing misalignment of hips and spine, and inflammatory conditions which result in aggravation of the surrounding soft tissue.

What can aggravate your back pain?

  • Sitting for long periods of time with poor posture
  • Lack of regular gentle exercise
  • Incorrect lifting techniques
  • Tension of the muscles of the back and legs
  • Magnesium deficiency can cause muscle spasm

How can YOU treat your back pain?

1. Check your sleeping posture

If you are waking in the morning with pain in your back, there is a strong possibility your sleep posture can be adding to your discomfort. In clinic I find the majority of people favour lay on one side with their bottom leg straight and their top leg bent at around 90 deg. This causes significant rotation in the pelvis whilst you are sleeping adding to tension one side of the spine. Try putting a small pillow or cushion between your knees and bending both knees at the same level. This will help to keep your pelvis and spine in a neutral position and provide relief for those lower back muscles.

2. Stretching

Releasing the tension in our muscles alongside our spine can go a long way to relieving back pain. I often tell my patients if you imagine your spine is like a tent pole, and your muscles are like the ropes holding it in position. If you tighten one side of the ropes you will pull the pole over. The spine is the same. Tight muscles pull at all our joints and can be responsible for a lot of misalignment of the joint space. Regular gentle stretching can provide relief for this tension.

Don’t forget the legs, particularly hamstrings, as they track from the back of our knees and attach to base of pelvis. If these are tight it can rotate our hips and put pressure on our lower back muscles.
Classes guided by an experienced therapist in Yoga, Clinical Pilates, Tai Qi and Qi gong can all provide you with knowledge so you can practice at home. We have Yoga, Qi Gong & Tai Chi classes here at Freedom Chinese Medicine.

I recommend daily practice in the morning after a light walk, and just before you go to bed to help you release tension that may have built up during the day.

Treatments available for back pain

Acupuncture has been used for thousands of years to treat a multitude of conditions and pain is a very common issue found in our clinic. Many studies have shown that Acupuncture has an analgesic (pain killing) effect to reduce discomfort and give patients back their freedom of movement. More than just pain relief Acupuncture techniques focus on the treating the inflammation and muscle tension that can occur with back issues.
A study was conducted in Melbourne hospitals showing that Acupuncture can be just as effective as opioid medications for all types of pain, without harmful side effects.²

Massage therapy has many very effective techniques for releasing muscle tension and stimulating blood flow to resolve the pain associated with back issues.

Herbs and supplements– Chinese herbal medicine has a history of treating pain conditions with herbs by stimulating blood flow to the area affected, relaxing muscles and moving the blockage of energy that accompanies back pain.
Vitamin and mineral supplementation particularly regular intake of magnesium can assist in getting tense and tight muscles to relax and switch off.³

We provide all of the above treatments here at Freedom Chinese Medicine. And we have several practitioners who have a particular passion & experience for helping people with back pain:

Dr. Jason Callanan

Dr. Daniel Gibbs

Dr. Roy Hughson

Dr. Christine Lee

Click here to read more about these excellent practitioners.

This article written by:

Dr Jason Callanan

Chinese Medical Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Massage Therapist

Jason has been practising Traditional Chinese Medicine for more than 10 years. In addition to his Acupuncture degree, he has also completed a Masters in Chinese Herbal Medicine.

Jason has also studied massage styles including Acupressure, remedial techniques, Trigger Point Therapy, and trained in Shiatsu under the private instruction of a Japanese Master. He has incorporated these massage techniques into his clinical practice of Acupuncture to achieve maximum benefit for his patients.

Jason was first introduced to Acupuncture more than 25 years ago when he received treatment for a back injury he was told would need surgery; instead he received six sessions of acupuncture which successfully resolved the issue. Following this experience, he developed a strong passion and interest in Chinese Medicine.

His treatments may include Acupuncture, Massage, Chinese Herbal Medicine, nutritional support, exercise advice… to treat illness, as well as maintaining wellness and vitality.

Jason is an experienced, caring and enthusiastic practitioner with a strong interest in musculo-skeletal issues, digestive health, and the restoration of emotional well-being and balance.

Jason is available:

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday
Call (03) 9486 5966

Prevention is Better Than Cure

prevention image

We all know this don’t we? It takes longer and costs more to fix a problem than it does to prevent it. So why don’t we prioritise preventative health care more? Perhaps because we’re not taught to..

Chinese Medicine is all for preventative medicine. There’s even a Chinese proverb for it: “Dig a well before you are thirsty”. Imagine starting to dig a well when you’re already thirsty.. Makes sense right? If we wait until we are sick before we seek treatment, how much more effort, time & cost is it going to take?

We all know how disruptive falling ill can be. We might need time off work, we can’t attend (or struggle to enjoy) social functions, time with family, projects get put on hold. It’s expensive to get sick. The same goes for car repairs. We all know how disruptive an unexpected car repair is; the trip to the garage, making alternative transport arrangements, the cost, the hassle, need I go on? We all know that regular services and tune ups for our vehicle is wise, finding and solving small problems before they become bigger problems. Ofcourse the human body is much more complex than a mechanical system. But can you see the analogy?

proactive

How much easier and cheaper would it be if we had regular check-ups & tune-ups for our health, rather than waiting for symptoms to appear? This goes for dentistry, Western medicine, chiropractic AND Chinese Medicine. In Ancient China, medical physicians were paid ONLY when the village was well, NOT when people fell ill. So Chinese Medicine has a well honed system for detecting imbalances and restoring health & vitality, before symptoms appear. In modern life, this can be as simple as a check-up every 3 months if you’re generally well and look after yourself. If your lifestyle or general health isn’t so great then monthly maintenance may be necessary. Whichever way, maintenance care costs a lot less time & money than curative care. When you fall sick, you need much more intervention.

once of prevention

Have you ever had the experience of a Chinese Medicine practitioner checking your pulse and tongue and being able to tell you what is going with your health with amazing accuracy? Many of the patients that come to see us at Freedom Chinese Medicine have. It’s fascinating and helpful to have this information. Whether it be how your digestion, nervous system are functioning, whether your coming down with something or are pregnant, a Chinese Medicine practitioner can be a font of information, which can help you stay well.

And then there’s the benefits of regular treatment. Check out this graph from a large German study shows how regular acupuncture sessions can improve your physical functioning, vitality, mental health and more:

Acupuncture for quality of life graph

Does regular acupuncture treatment really cost more than conventional treatment?

No. The costs are clear-cut: acupuncturists don’t employ fancy technical products. We do not order a large number of diagnostic tests. And the number of sessions taken to achieve the results are modest. On average, 10 acupuncture sessions were necessary to achieve treatment effects with stability over four years, which translates to a rough estimate of AUD$580 per patient, with no hidden costs for expensive drugs. To treat a migraine patient suffering 2 attacks a month over the course of one year, using an effective triptane would cost at least the same in one year, taking only the drug costs into account and without including the cost of visits to the doctor and the cost of diagnostics. Thus, here we have a potential for cost-saving warranting further and more intricate exploration.²

So Wellness Care with Chinese Medicine is well worth it. All it may take is a check-up and tune up once a month if you’re generally well or even once every 3 months if you have a very healthy lifestyle. What are you waiting for? Click here to book now.

 

Written by:

Dr Elaine Hickman

B.H.Sc.TCM (Acupuncture), Cert.Cl.Ac. (Beijing)

Elaine has trained and worked in various settings, both in Australia and China.  She has over 20 years experience in treating many health problems.  Elaine loves to provide a health care experience for people that is respectful, effective, empowering and enjoyable.  Elaine’s acupuncture treatments are gentle, powerful, amazingly relaxing and incorporate Japanese & Chinese techniques, as well as Medical Qi Gong if appropriate.  Elaine has a particular interest in Gynaecology, Fertility, Obstetrics, Family Medicine, Wellness promotion and Mental Health.

She runs a private practice in Ivanhoe and is the trusted family physician of many. Elaine is a registered Doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). She completed a Bachelor of Health Science – TCM, specialising in Acupuncture, and a hospital internship in China in 1998. Elaine is the Principal Practitioner at Freedom Chinese Medicine, managing a dedicated team of practitioners & staff, and supervises many TCM students in clinical training. Elaine’s passion for Chinese Medicine has her regularly furthering her education, Qi Gong training and sharing knowledge.

 

References

1. http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/591796/

2. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/4/6/

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/4/6/figure/F2

Longer term clinical and economic benefits of offering acupuncture to patients with chronic low back pain assessed as suitable for primary care management
K.J. Thomas1, M. Fitter2, J. Brazier3, H. MacPherson2, M. Campbell4, J.P. Nicholl1, M. Roman5

IBS Relief

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Western medicine categorises IBS as a functional disorder not a disease.  Chinese medicine is particularly effective at treating disorders of function in the body.

IBS Facts

  • Affects more females than males
  • About 15% of the adult population suffers from IBS.
  • Emotional stress and mental tension related
  • Allergies or allergic body constitution related.

 

Holistic Treatment

  • High fibre diet
  • Avoiding improper food
  • Acupuncture and moxibustion
  • Herbal medicine
  • Tai Chi, Qi Gong
  • Meditation
  • Psychological counselling
  • Stress management
  • Abdominal massage
  • Exercises, walk after meals
  • Social activities
  • Good sleep
  • Regulating menstruation

 

Keep a Diary

One month diary of food intake and bowel movements necessary to determine what affect (if any) food intake has on the bowel.

Example:

 

20/05/2004FoodBowel Action
6am Loose stool
8amBreakfast – weetbix, diary milk, sugar 
10amFruit & nut muesli bar 
12:30pm Abdominal pain & diarrhoea
1pmTake away – stir fried rice noodles & vegetables 
3:30pmBlack tea & choc biscuit 
6pmGreen salad & grilled chickenBloated
7pm Diarrhoea with mucus
10pmOrange 
11pm Burping

Foods not recommended

 

  • Fatty foods
  • Fried foods
  • Diary products – milk, cheese, ice cream, yogurt, etc.
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Carbonated drinks – soft drink

 

Recommended TCM  treatment protocol

 

Initial 4 weeks:

Acupuncture & Moxibustion treatment twice per week for the first two weeks, then once a week in Week 3 & 4.

Daily intake of herbal medicines over 4 weeks.

Self Management

 

This program is simple, powerful and (if followed!) can replace the need for acupuncture and Moxibustion treatment.

 

 

TimeActivity
6.30amAbdominal massage
7.00amWalk or exercises for 10 minutes
8.00amHigh fibre breakfast
8.20amAbdominal massage
8.30amWalk for 10 minutes
12.00pmHigh fibre lunch
12.20pmAbdominal massage
12.30pmWalk for 10 mins
6.30pmHigh fibre dinner
7.00pmAbdominal massage
7.10pmWalk for 20-30 minutes
10.00pmAbdominal massage

 

Abdominal massage involves 100 gentle circles in each direction.

Magnesium-rich foods for muscle tension

Magnesium is a natural muscle relaxant. Here is a list of foods which are Magnesium-rich to help your tense muscles!

FOODMAGNESIUM CONTENT
 (mg)
  
Peanuts, all types, roasted – ½ cup131
Tofu, raw, regular – ½ cup127
Peanuts, all types, raw – ½ cup123
Broccoli, cooked – 2 large stalks120
Spinach, cooked – ½ cup76
Cashews, dry roasted 1 ounce75
Soybeans, cooked – ½ cup74
Tomato paste, canned – ½ cup67
Simulated meat products, meat extender – 1 ounce61
Small white beans, cooked – ½ cup61
Sweet potato, canned, mashed – ½ cup61
Nuts & seeds, all types – 1 ounce60 avg. (9 – 152)
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup60
Dock (sorrel), cooked – ½ cup60
Chilli with beans, canned – ½ cup58
White beans, cooked – ½ cup57
Baked beans – ½ cup55
Navy beans, cooked – ½ cup53
Peanut butter – 2 tbsp51
Succotash, cooked – ½ cup51
Beet greens, cooked – ½ cup49
Lima beans, baby, cooked – ½ cup49
Refried beans, canned – ½ cup49
Wholegrain cereals, ready-to-eat – 1 ounce47 avg. (22 – 134)
Mung beans, cooked – ½ cup47
Artichoke, cooked – 1 medium47
Pinto beans, cooked – ½ cup47
Blackeyed peas, dried, cooked – ½ cup46
Okra, cooked – ½ cup46
Great Northern beans – ½ cup44

Foods for Liver Qi Stagnation

What and how we eat can make a big difference to our health. Here are some general and specific tips to help you if you’re experiencing Liver Qi Stagnation as diagnosed by your Chinese Medicine practitioner.

• Include a large variety of foods in the diet.
• Live on a mainly vegetarian diet of light, simple foods.
• Eat largely whole, unprocessed foods.
• Chew and swallow slowly.
• Relax whilst eating; avoid eating while reading, watching TV or rushing.
• Eat regularly. The amount of food and time of meals should be similar every day. Optimal is breakfast at about 7 A.M., lunch around 12 noon and supper at 6 P.M.
• Food intake should be greatest in the morning, a moderate amount at lunch, and a small amount at the evening meal.
• Eat small amounts of food frequently rather than large amounts of food infrequently.
• Avoid eating when in any kind of extreme emotional state.
• Eat moderately at each meal; eat until only 2/3 full.
• Eat clean, fresh, organic and seasonally ripe produce as often as possible.
• Avoid extremes in the diet, such as too hot, spicy, too raw, too cold, or too greasy.
• Balance the five flavours; sour, bitter, sweet, pungent and salty, to the best of your ability. Ask your practitioner for clarification on flavour categorisation.
• Avoid eating anything 2-3 hours before sleep.

Specific advice for Liver Qi Stagnation

Have:

Beef, chicken livers, celery, kelp, mussels, nori, plums, basil, bay leaves, beets, black pepper, saffron, cabbage, eggplant, coconut milk, garlic, ginger, leeks, peaches, scallions and rosemary.

Avoid:

Alcohol, coffee, turkey, fatty foods, fried foods, excessively spicy foods, large serves of red meat, sugar and sweets.

 

Foods for Qi Deficiency

What and how we eat can make a big difference to our health. Here are some general and specific tips to help you if you’re experiencing Qi Deficiency as diagnosed by your Chinese Medicine practitioner.

• Include a large variety of foods in the diet.
• Live on a mainly vegetarian diet of light, simple foods.
• Eat largely whole, unprocessed foods.
• Chew and swallow slowly.
• Relax whilst eating; avoid eating while reading, watching TV or rushing.
• Eat regularly. The amount of food and time of meals should be similar every day. Optimal is breakfast at about 7 A.M., lunch around 12 noon and supper at 6 P.M.
• Food intake should be greatest in the morning, a moderate amount at lunch, and a small amount at the evening meal.
• Eat small amounts of food frequently rather than large amounts of food infrequently.
• Avoid eating when in any kind of extreme emotional state.
• Eat moderately at each meal; eat until only 2/3 full.
• Eat clean, fresh, organic and seasonally ripe produce as often as possible.
• Avoid extremes in the diet, such as too hot, spicy, too raw, too cold, or too greasy.
• Balance the five flavours; sour, bitter, sweet, pungent and salty, to the best of your ability. Ask your practitioner for clarification on flavour categorisation.
• Avoid eating anything 2-3 hours before sleep.

Specific advice for Qi Deficiency

Have:

Half of total calories should come from grains and legumes, a third from vegetables, about 15 percent from meats, but to avoid taxing digestion, eat only two to three ounces per serving. Five percent of total calories should come from dairy. Recommended foods include rice or barley broth, garlic, leeks, string beans, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and carrots. Also have cooked and warmed foods, frequent, small meals, cooked yellow vegetables, small amounts of chicken or turkey (especially in soups) and warming spices such as dried ginger and cinnamon.

Avoid:

Cold or cooling foods, tofu, milk, cheese, excessively sweet foods, liquid with meals, raw food, salads, fruits, and juices in excess.

 

Foods for Damp Accumulation

What and how we eat can make a big difference to our health. Here are some general and specific tips to help you if you’re experiencing Damp Accumulation as diagnosed by your Chinese Medicine practitioner.

• Include a large variety of foods in the diet.
• Live on a mainly vegetarian diet of light, simple foods.
• Eat largely whole, unprocessed foods.
• Chew and swallow slowly.
• Relax whilst eating; avoid eating while reading, watching TV or rushing.
• Eat regularly. The amount of food and time of meals should be similar every day. Optimal is breakfast at about 7 A.M., lunch around 12 noon and supper at 6 P.M.
• Food intake should be greatest in the morning, a moderate amount at lunch, and a small amount at the evening meal.
• Eat small amounts of food frequently rather than large amounts of food infrequently.
• Avoid eating when in any kind of extreme emotional state.
• Eat moderately at each meal; eat until only 2/3 full.
• Eat clean, fresh, organic and seasonally ripe produce as often as possible.
• Avoid extremes in the diet, such as too hot, spicy, too raw, too cold, or too greasy.
• Balance the five flavours; sour, bitter, sweet, pungent and salty, to the best of your ability. Ask your practitioner for clarification on flavour categorisation.
• Avoid eating anything 2-3 hours before sleep.

Specific advice for Damp Accumulation

Have:

Barley, corn, adzuki beans, green tea, garlic, mushrooms, mustard greens, chicken, alfalfa, shrimp, scallions and rye.

Avoid:

Too much red meat, salt, sugar, dairy, pork, shark meat, eggs, sardines, octopus, coconut milk, cucumber, bananas, duck, goose, seaweed, olives, soybeans, tofu, spinach, pine nuts and alcohol.

 

Foods for Spleen Deficiency

What and how we eat can make a big difference to our health. Here are some general and specific tips to help you if you’re experiencing Spleen Deficiency as diagnosed by your Chinese Medicine practitioner.

• Include a large variety of foods in the diet.
• Live on a mainly vegetarian diet of light, simple foods.
• Eat largely whole, unprocessed foods.
• Chew and swallow slowly.
• Relax whilst eating; avoid eating while reading, watching TV or rushing.
• Eat regularly. The amount of food and time of meals should be similar every day. Optimal is breakfast at about 7 A.M., lunch around 12 noon and supper at 6 P.M.
• Food intake should be greatest in the morning, a moderate amount at lunch, and a small amount at the evening meal.
• Eat small amounts of food frequently rather than large amounts of food infrequently.
• Avoid eating when in any kind of extreme emotional state.
• Eat moderately at each meal; eat until only 2/3 full.
• Eat clean, fresh, organic and seasonally ripe produce as often as possible.
• Avoid extremes in the diet, such as too hot, spicy, too raw, too cold, or too greasy.
• Balance the five flavours; sour, bitter, sweet, pungent and salty, to the best of your ability. Ask your practitioner for clarification on flavour categorisation.
• Avoid eating anything 2-3 hours before sleep.

Specific advice for Spleen Deficiency

Have:

Cooked, warming foods such as squash, carrots, potatoes, yams, rutabagas, turnips, leeks, onions, rice, oats, butter, small amounts of chicken, turkey, mutton or beef, cooked peaches, cherries, strawberries, figs, cardamom, ginger, cinnamon, red/black dates, nutmeg, black pepper, custards and small amounts of honey. Food should be well chewed and eaten in moderate amounts. Soups are especially helpful.

Avoid:

Salsa, citrus, juices in excess, cold or raw food, too much salt, tofu, millet, buckwheat, milk, cheese, seaweed, and excess sugar.